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  1. I love me some sauerkraut. I use the wild fermentation method (great book btw!) but i add a tiny amount of mustard seeds and a little caraway as well as toning down on the salt. Tastes it daily and stop it fermenting when it tastes just right! (for me its about 3 weeks)

  2. Thanks for mentioning our krauts! Be sure to look for “raw” or “unpasteurized” on the label of your krauts- some brands (like Bubbies) are in the cold section but still pasteurized (their bulk kraut is sometimes raw- be sure to ask first). Pasteurization kills off the probiotic bacteria.

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        Author

        No, I think the amount they heat it is under pasteurization temps. That said, it’s probably not as ideal as some other, smaller-batch entirely raw brands.

      2. The active probiotic cultures can cause leakage and pressure in unheated, completely raw krauts. Bubbies is heated to “calm” the bacteria, to make it easier to package and ship, and they don’t say how high of a temperature. They claim to still have active cultures, unlike a high-temp canned pasteurized kraut. I’m obviously not an unbiased source, but I’d say stick with a brand labelled “raw” or “unheated” to get the maximum benefits from sauerkraut.

        1. I made some kraut about a month ago…it’s still sitting in the fridge half eaten. Does it go bad? Or by cooling it does that stop the fermentation process, and now it’s preserved for how long? Is there a safe amount of time it can sit uneaten?

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            Author

            Keeping in the fridge should allow it to last quite a long time if it’s tightly sealed- months perhaps. Yes, the cold air stops the fermentation process. I did find some kraut I had in a less-tightly sealed jar that looked a bit off after several weeks while I was away and didn’t get to finish it!

            So… really the kraut should last a pretty long time, but you’d probably notice if it was off- mine looked a bit slimy. Ick.

        2. I love you Farmhouse Culture. All out of the regular kind I buy, the garlic dill. Today, I opted for Horseradish Leek. Yummy. <3

  3. I bought some good raw sauerkraut recently, but it’s not a food that I grew up with and I’m having a hard time adjusting to the taste. Does anyone have a food pairing suggestion? What kind of foods complement (and/or mask) the flavor?
    Thanks 🙂

  4. I was just wondering if raw sauerkraut is okay if you’re following an autoimmune version of the paleo diet. (No eggs, nuts, fruit, or nightshade veggies)
    Any thoughts?

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      Author

      I would say it’s safe to eat as it’s cabbage + salt if you buy it raw. Some people do have trouble with fermented foods and vinegars but typically those are more issues of toxicity and liver detox problems vs an autoimmune condition. You should be good to go with the kraut! 🙂

  5. I love my cultured veggies! So many options! My latest ferment was carrots, golden beets, and golden raisins. So beautiful with an ever so slight sweetness with the tanginess of the fermentation.

  6. Do you think mixing in some Raw, unpasteurized kraut with some pasteurized kraut will ferment the once pasteurized kraut?

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      Author
    1. That is not what the article says if you read it closely. Basically coliforms die off, then leuconostoc is formed, and then the leuonostoc eventually dies and the Lactobacillus begins to set in, which is the “probiotic” that we are looking for. Lactobacillus bacterias are the types you will find in supplements, kefirs, and yogurts.

      Coliforms which have contributed to our lab-made sauerkraut in recent years have been identified as Klebsiella pneumoniae, K. oxytoca and Enterobacter cloacae. As acid is produced, an environment more favorable for Leuconostoc is quickly formed. The coliform population declines as the population of a strain of Leuconostoc builds. As Leuconostoc
      is a heterofermentative lactic acid bacterium, much gas (carbon
      dioxide) accompanies the acid production during this stage. The pH
      continues to drop, and a strain of Lactobacillus succeeds the Leuconostoc.

  7. Is there a specific bacteria or culture that is better than others for kraut?
    I’ve got many varieties of brewing yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Brettanomyces) for beer and wine hanging about as well as some kombucha cultures that are working their way through some tea.
    For most fermented things its safer to dose the product with the desired microbes so they edge out the undesired wild yeasts/ bacteria.

    Has anyone had any experience using the wild fermentation you’re describing?

  8. Hey I made a 2 1/2 gallons of kraut and I used R O water and hymalayan pink salt for the minerals. It took 5 weeks. Took it out, put it in pint jars with ball lids, put it in the fridge it is Wonderful. I have had to be on a strong antibiotic for a long time and it has changed my gut, too the better, extremly!!. It taste great. I used half red and half white cabbage and it is as crisp and chauked full of flavor. If I get acid indigestion, two spoonsful will make it disappear in seconds! truly amazing. I wait to eat the kraut at least 2 hrs after taking the antibiotics. To allow them to work and then the probiotics to do their thing. All in all I am doing much better now with the Raw and fermented Kraut. UHMMMM
    EASY EASY and GOOD

  9. Love Kombucha. Fav brand is enlightened. No added sugar and a nice alternative to water. Need all the probiotics I can get

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      Author

      They are all made with sugar to start, but the remaining quantities vary. As long as it doesn’t taste sweet you should be okay on sugar content.

      1. Thank you for reviewing Bubbies. I have looked at it in the store many times, but didn’t know how it tasted and the deli workers didn’t know either.

  10. I purchased some raw kraut but it was left in the car for a day. So, instead of being in the refrigerator is came home warm. Is it still good to eat?

    1. @leonora, I’d say depends on where you live. If you live in Arizona heat, NO…haha. But, it depends on the time of year you left it in the car and how war it was. You don’t want to risk getting sick from spoiled food. Personally, I’d throw away and start over, unless someone else has other tips.:)

  11. Does mixing in somem pasteurized kraut with a single serving of raw, fermented kraut negatively effect the latter in any way? Thanks!

  12. I’m planning on transitioning soon to a Paleo-type diet, and I’m also a big fan of fermented food (sourdough, home brewer, love yogurt and cheese). I watched your video, and today I bought some Bubbie. Just tasted it, and I did like that it tastes fresh although sharply acidic. I’m hoping to eventually make my own kraut to get the full benefit of the probiotics. One thing that concerns me is that I live in a small apartment, and am worried about the smell of fermenting kraut overwhelming the atmosphere. Anyone have some experience with this? How bad does it get?

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      Author
  13. 2nd try (discus ate my first one). 100% paleo. Want to add fermented foods. I have a good source for fresh raw sauerkraut but find it too sour to eat. Anything I can do to tone down the sour-ness?

    Andrea

  14. That is not what the article says if you read it closely. Basically coliforms die off, then leuconostoc is formed, and then the leuonostoc eventually dies and the Lactobacillus begins to set in, which is the “probiotic” that we are looking for. Lactobacillus bacterias are the types you will find in supplements, kefirs, and yogurts.

    Coliforms which have contributed to our lab-made sauerkraut in recent years have been identified as Klebsiella pneumoniae, K. oxytoca and Enterobacter cloacae. As acid is produced, an environment more favorable for Leuconostoc is quickly formed. The coliform population declines as the population of a strain of Leuconostoc builds. As Leuconostoc
    is a heterofermentative lactic acid bacterium, much gas (carbon
    dioxide) accompanies the acid production during this stage. The pH
    continues to drop, and a strain of Lactobacillus succeeds the Leuconostoc.

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  18. You can make it less sour by…. first off make it homemade so you have control over it, taste it as it continues to ferment, if you ferment it at 65F in a root cellar it will take a bit longer but will be less “tangy and sour”, put it in the fridge when you are happy with the taste – if you don’t like the sourness then you will want to move it to the fridge around 5 to 6 days when it is still at a relatively early stage of fermentation and not fully fermented (this has the negative consequence that you should finish it in 3-4 weeks as it will not keep as long in the fridge). Finally you can make the taste significantly blander by straining out the sauerkraut juice out of it each time right before you eat only the solid sauerkraut. Straining requires significant crushing strength.

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